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How It Works

The Fentanyl detection kits described here utilize a three-part process involving a Microscoop, deionized water, and a custom fentanyl testing cassette.
Below is a detailed breakdown of each step:

Microscoop

The 10 mg/ml dilution is specific to WHPM Fentanyl Test Strips. This dilution is tailored for harm reduction purposes, providing an alternative to using a milligram scale for measuring the correct dosage. Fentanyl Test Strips from other manufacturers may require independent laboratory assessment for sensitivity and specificity performance.

Deionized Water:

Deionized water, also known as DI water, has had ions removed, and ions are molecules with positive or negative electrical charges. The process involves adding substances to a vial containing deionized water to create a solution for testing.

Cassette for Results:

The testing cassette has clear instructions for result interpretation:
One red line on top after three minutes indicates a positive result for the presence of fentanyl. Two red lines indicate a negative result. The lower red line may be lighter, but any visibility after three minutes is considered a negative result. No red lines or one red line at the bottom signify an invalid test, prompting a retest with a new strip. The test is intended for detecting Fentanyl in substances or urine at a cutoff concentration of 10 ng/ml.

Principle of the Test:

The One Step Fentanyl Drug of Abuse Test is based on lateral flow chromatographic immunoassay. It operates on the principle of competitive binding, where a drug competes against its respective drug conjugate for binding sites on a specific antibody. A visible colored line appears in the test line region if the drug concentration is below the cutoff. If above the cutoff, the line does not form. A control line always appears, serving as a procedural control.

Quality Control and Considerations:

The control line acts as an internal procedural control, confirming sufficient specimen volume, adequate membrane wicking, and correct procedural technique. Technical or procedural errors, as well as interfering substances, may cause erroneous results. A positive result does not indicate intoxication, route of drug administration, or concentration. Negative results may not guarantee drug-free substances or urine. The test does not distinguish between drugs of abuse and certain medications.

Storage and Usage Instructions:

The test device should be stored in a sealed pouch at 4-30°C until the expiration date. It is for single use, and gloves are recommended to avoid unnecessary contact with specimens. Used test devices and specimens should be discarded according to federal, state, and local regulations.

Test Procedure:

The test involves removing the device from its foil pouch, adding substance to the buffer vial, and placing drops into the sample well. Results should be read at 5 minutes, and readings after 10 minutes are not valid. In summary, the Fentanyl detection process involves a straightforward and convenient method that combines dilution, competitive binding, and visual interpretation for harm reduction purposes.The Fentanyl detection kits described here utilize a three-part process involving a microscoop, deionized water, and a custom fentanyl testing cassette.

Below is a detailed breakdown of each step:

Microscoop:

The 10 mg/ml dilution is specific to WHPM Fentanyl Test Strips. This dilution is tailored for harm reduction purposes, providing an alternative to using a milligram scale for measuring the correct dosage. Fentanyl Test Strips from other manufacturers may require independent laboratory assessment for sensitivity and specificity performance.

Deionized Water:

Deionized water, also known as DI water, has had ions removed, and ions are molecules with positive or negative electrical charges. The process involves adding substances to a vial containing deionized water to create a solution for testing.

Cassette for Results:

The testing cassette has clear instructions for result interpretation:

One red line on top after three minutes indicates a positive result for the presence of fentanyl. Two red lines indicate a negative result. The lower red line may be lighter, but any visibility after three minutes is considered a negative result. No red lines or one red line at the bottom signify an invalid test, prompting a retest with a new strip. The test is intended for detecting Fentanyl in substances or urine at a cutoff concentration of 10 ng/ml.

Principle of the Test:

The One Step Fentanyl Drug of Abuse Test is based on lateral flow chromatographic immunoassay. It operates on the principle of competitive binding, where a drug competes against its respective drug conjugate for binding sites on a specific antibody. A visible colored line appears in the test line region if the drug concentration is below the cutoff. If above the cutoff, the line does not form. A control line always appears, serving as a procedural control.

Quality Control and Considerations:

The control line acts as an internal procedural control, confirming sufficient specimen volume, adequate membrane wicking, and correct procedural technique. Technical or procedural errors, as well as interfering substances, may cause erroneous results. A positive result does not indicate intoxication, route of drug administration, or concentration. Negative results may not guarantee drug-free substances or urine. The test does not distinguish between drugs of abuse and certain medications.

Storage and Usage Instructions:

The test device should be stored in a sealed pouch at 4-30°C until the expiration date. It is for single use, and gloves are recommended to avoid unnecessary contact with specimens. Used test devices and specimens should be discarded according to federal, state, and local regulations.

Test Procedure:

The test involves removing the device from its foil pouch, adding substance to the buffer vial, and placing drops into the sample well. Results should be read at 5 minutes, and readings after 10 minutes are not valid. In summary, the Fentanyl detection process involves a straightforward and convenient method that combines dilution, competitive binding, and visual interpretation for harm reduction purposes.

What Is Fentanyl?

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid fifty times stronger than heroin. Since about 2018 it has become the dominant opioid on the illicit market. Found in pills and powders, including non-opioid drugs and counterfeit pharmaceuticals, fentanyl is responsible for tens of thousands of deaths a year in the U.S. alone.

National Opioid Overdose Deaths (primarily fentanyl)

About The WHPM Fentanyl Test Strips

The WHPM fentanyl test strips were developed specifically for harm reduction use. With a detection cutoff of 10 ng/ml, they are one of the most sensitive test strips on the market. They are also highly selective to fentanyl and its analogs, meaning they are less likely to cross-react with other, non-fentanyl-related drugs.

The Importance of Sample Preparation

When fentanyl is contaminating other substances, it is unlikely to be mixed evenly. This is called the “chocolate chip cookie effect” and is why the best recommendation is to dilute and test the entire sample of the substance (i.e. pill or baggie of powder). However, because many people are only willing or able to test a small portion of their substance, sample preparation to avoid false negatives and false positives is extremely important. Here are the three components of proper sample preparation:

1. Crush and mix – In order to reduce the chocolate chip cookie effect and redistribute any fentanyl as evenly as possible throughout the sample, the entire sample must be crushed and mixed thoroughly.

2. Test as much as you are willing – To maximize the chance that the portion being tested will contain fentanyl (if fentanyl is contaminating the sample), test the largest amount possible. WHPM recommends a minimum of 50 mg.

3. Dilute the portion to 10 mg/ml* – To maximize the chance of detecting even a tiny amount of fentanyl that was hopefully captured in the chosen portion, dilute the portion only enough to avoid false positives, and not much more.** The WHPM fentanyl test strips have been laboratory tested on the most common drugs and drug cuts, and they did not produce false positives even at the high concentration of 10 mg/ml in water.***

Following the protocols for sample preparation above are the best practices for using the WHPM Fentanyl Test Strip. Instructions from other suppliers offering non-specific dilution protocols (i.e., “put a little bit of powder into a small amount of water”) risk false positives and false negatives.

The following User Instructions were specifically developed to optimize the performance of the WHPM Fentanyl Strips to ensure accurate detection while limiting the possibility of cross-reactivity.

Download Quick Reference Guide HERE
Download Fentanyl Analogs HERE
Download Fentanyl Forensic Insert Here
Download Fentanyl White Paper Report Here

* The 10 mg/ml dilution is specific to WHPM Fentanyl Test Strips. Fentanyl Test Strips for harm reduction use from other manufacturers require independent laboratory assessment to determine their sensitivity and specificity performance characteristics.
** At higher concentrations, many substances can produce a false positive result. This is why Harm Reduction Use specific laboratory assessment must be conducted to determine the sensitivity and specificity performance characteristics of a test strip.
*** Diphenhydramine gives false positives with all fentanyl test strips on the market. Fortunately, diphenhydramine is not typically found in illicit, non-opiod drug samples.